Fat Lad At The Back

  • What's stopping you from signing up for a sportive?

     

    Picture by Simon Wilkinson/SWpix.com - 07/05/2017 - Cycling Fat Lad at the Back Sportive - Ilkley - leisure cycling

    Sportives are a grand day out on the bike they let you cycle around a new area without having to worry about getting lost or finding a café for a mid-ride refuelling stop.

    We know that loads of our FLAB community would love to enter their first sportive but have a few concerns about taking part, here are the main ones that our FLAB community forum said was preventing them from taking part.

    FITNESS-  If you can comfortably ride 80% of the distance on similar terrain to the distance you’ve signed up to at 10mph you’ll complete our sportive. FLambassadors are on route to talk through options if you’ve bitten off more than you can chew.

    HILLS- STOP WORRYING! If you can’t cycle up to the top WALK, there’s no shame in walking up a hill.

    CONFIDENCE- Our sportive is super friendly, inclusive and supportive with the option of riding in a friendly group with the support of one of our awesome Ride Marshalls.

    MECANICALS- Carry a puncture repair kit and learn to fix a puncture before the event, it’s a lot easier than you think just takes a bit of practice. Loads of tutorials on YOUTUBE.

    FINISHING LAST- Who cares? You’ve lapped everyone on the sofa.

     

    Picture by Allan McKenzie/SWpix.com - 07/05/2017 - Commercial - Cycling - Cycling - Fat Lad at The Back Yorkshire Sportive - Ilkley, England - Cycling, Leisure.FITNESS

    Will I be fit enough? Can I make it to the finish line?

    First thing to remember is a sportive is NOT a race the only competition is with yourself, do it at your pace within your comfort zone and don’t try and keep up with other people or compare your pace to others.

    There will be Ride Marshalls on route to offer support.

    If you’ve done a reasonable amount of training beforehand relevant to the distance you’ve entered you will fine. So, for instance if you can comfortably do 18 miles you will be able to 25 miles on the day and the atmosphere of the event and adrenaline can really help push you those last few miles.

    There is always Ride Marshalls on the route that you can chat to about options if you feel you’ve bitten off more than you can chew.

    HILLS,HILLS,HILLS

    STOP fearing hills! It is so easy to go into a complete meltdown at the thought of hills on a sportive and that big hill that you know is coming up can soon become the whole focus of your ride taking away from your enjoyment, remember THERE IS NO SHAME IN WALKING UP THEM.

    So what if someone fly’s past you with ease having a chat with their mates making it look easy while your legs are screaming and your lungs are on fire!

    Everybody is different it’s your body your bike ride and your business how you get up them! If you have to walk then walk it’s much better to get off and walk to the top in one piece than push yourself beyond your limits, risk injuring yourself and having a very unpleasant experience.

    STOP PANICKING IT’S ONLY A HILL! If anyone mocks another cyclist for walking up a hill we say SHAME ON THEM! We salute anyone getting of the sofa and having a go!

    Picture by Allan McKenzie/SWpix.com - 07/05/2017 - Commercial - Cycling - Cycling - Fat Lad at The Back Yorkshire Sportive - Ilkley, England - Cycling, Leisure.  Our feed stops are legendary

    CONFIDENCE

    Signing up for your first event can be pretty nerve racking with so many what ifs to worry about, being judged, being last, riding on your own, what if I get lost….

    Our sportive is unique as we have Ride marshalls who ride the whole route with groups making sure that everyone has an awesome experience and you won’t ever feel alone or worry about getting lost as our Ride Marshalls will be there to support you along the route.

    If you’d rather do it on your own the route is fully signposted and you can download it prior to the event. We also so set the longer distance riders off first you will get very few riders overtaking you along the route.

    MECHANICALS

    It’s always important to carry a puncture repair kit, a couple of inner tubes, tyre levers pump etc. with you on the route. If you don’t know how to change a puncture it’s worth learning how to do it before hand.

    There are loads of very easy tutorials on YOUTUBE showing you step by step how to change an inner tube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwwfV99VV8I

    Best time to do it is in the comfort of your own home/garage/shed when you have plenty of time , you’ll be surprised after a few goes just how easy it is to master with a bit of practice, and there will be hundreds of other cyclists passing and many of them will stop and offer to help you out if it’s not something you can fix yourself.

    FINISHING LAST 

    Picture by Allan McKenzie/SWpix.com - 07/05/2017 - Commercial - Cycling - Cycling - Fat Lad at The Back Yorkshire Sportive - Ilkley, England - Cycling, Leisure.

    N’owt wrong with finishing at the back, so whether it’s taken you two hours or five hours you’ve ridden the same distance as all the others on the same route and lapped all those sitting on the couch.

    CLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILS OF THE FLAB UP NORTH SPORTIVE 2018 https://fatladattheback.com/sportive/up-north-sportive

     

     

     

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  • 10 Road safety tips

    10 ROAD SAFETY TIPS

    1. Road positioning - don’t ride in the gutter
    2. Be aware of other road users
    3. Be seen
    4. Always follow the Highway Code
    5. Try and make eye contact with other road users
    6. Avoid riding up the inside of large vehicles
    7. Signal clearly
    8. Be careful of vehicle doors
    9. Make sure your bike is road worthy
    10. Think about cycle training

    Road positioning

    Don’t ride in the gutter!

    Ride positively,decisively and well clear of the kerb where you can see and be seen.

    Ride in Primary position (middle of the lane) when passing side roads and going through pinch points.

    Picture1

    Be aware of other road users

    Leave enough distance between you and the vehicle in front of you so that you can stop safely if it suddenly brakes.

    Look out for pedestrians.

    Always be aware of other road users and try to anticipate what they might do.

    This includes vehicles on the opposite side of the road which may cut across your path, vehicles may need to move into your lane to avoid hazards and parked cars and vehicles waiting to pull out from side roads.

    Be seen

    Always use lights when it’s dark or visibility is poor.

    The highway code advises wearing light coloured or reflective clothing during the day  and/or accessories in the dark to increase your visibility.

    High viz and reflectivity on the feet works really well as it’s a moving part.

    Follow the high way code

    Always follow the highway code.

    You can find the Highway Code for Cyclists here

    Observe ‘STOP’ and “GIVE WAY’ signs and traffic lights.

    Make eye contact

    Make eye contact where possible so you know drivers have seen you. If the other road user is not looking at you they may not have seen you.

    Avoid riding up the inside of large vehicles

    Large vehicles like buses and lorries which have a huge blind spot and may not see you.

    If a lorry or bus is indicating left, passing on the inside can be dangerous.

    Hang back at the junction to reduce the risk of a collision.

    Picture2

    Signal clearly

    Look and signal clearly to show drivers what you plan to do.

    If you can only avoid an obstruction by moving out into the flow of traffic, check over your right shoulder first to ensure that you have room to move out. If a vehicle is travelling too close to you to allow this, slow down until you have a safe gap.

    Be careful of vehicle doors

    When approaching parked vehicles, look over your right shoulder looking for other vehicles and when safe to do so move out into a position where you can pass the vehicle safely.

    If possible leave a car doors width between you and the vehicle in case the door opens.

    Make sure your bike is road worthy

    Keep your bike in a road worthy condition making sure you regularly check brakes for wear and tear.

    keep your lights clean of mud and dirt especially during the winter months.

    Tyres should be in good condition and kept inflated to the correct pressure.

    Keep your chain properly adjusted and oiled

    Think about cycle training

    Signing up for some cycle training is a great way to feel more confident and develop your riding skills especially if you’re new to cycling or haven’t ridden for a while.

    You can find out about local courses by phoning the National Cycle Training Helpline on

    0844 7368460

    There are a great series of video’s available on the British cycling website on learning to commute with confidence here

    More video’s available  here for every day riding through to participating in sportive events with their Ridesmart videos

     

     

     

  • FLAB Winter cycling survival guide - Feet

    FLAB Winter survival guide – Feet

    Many of us struggle to keep our feet warm during the winter, here are our top five items to help keep your toes nice and toastie.

    • Socks
    • Toe warmers
    • Overshoes
    • Winter Cycling boots
    • Household helpers-tinfoil/clingfilm

    Socks

    Screen Shot 2017-12-03 at 15.43.15Layering your socks works really well at keeping your feet nice and warm.

    Our Fat Lad At The Back merino wool thermal socks offer great protection against the cold.

    When it turns really cold wollie bollie socks from defeet come into there own. These non itchy heavyweight wool socks are awesome at keeping your feet warm and if your shoes allow it when it’s near freezing pop a thinner pair of socks underneath.

     

    Sealskinz waterproof and windproof socks can be worn on there own and are great if you don’t wear cycling shoes and can’t get overshoes to fit your chosen cycling footwear. They also work really well layered with socks and overshoes although you do have to accept that if you are cycling for a long time in the rain it will inevitably run down your legs and into your shoes no matter what you’re wearing.

     

    Toe warmers

    These are great for those in between times of years like autumn and spring. Really easy to get on you just pop them on over the toes of your cycling shoes.

    Overshoes

    You can get all different types of overshoes, some are just made of material to make you more aerodynamic and some are windproof and waterproof.

    Sealskinz neoprone overshoe

    Neoprone overshoes offer your feet the most protection from the winter weather. They can be tricky to get on so make sure you buy the correct size.

    Winter boots

    The all in one faff free way to keep your feet warm and dry in winter, wind and water proof and a doddle to get on and off and no more wrestling trying to get your overshoes on. Northwave winter boots

     

    cling filmHousehold helpers - clingfilm

     Using Cling film as a vapour barrier can be amazingly effective at keeping your feet warm and dry.

    Humble cling film is apparently used by loads of pro cyclists in winter to help keep their feet warm. Sir Bradley Wiggins once tweeted how he used cling film to keep his feet warm on a winter training ride.

    Wear a thin pair of socks then wrap feet in cling film and pop a pair of thicker socks over the top.

    Rain and wind are kept from getting directly to your skin.

    Household helpers – Tinfoil

    tin foil

    It's readily available in the home or at a cafe stop and makes a great 'emergency blanket' for cold feet.

    Use it to line your cycling shoes to help block out cold air coming through the vents.

    Wrap over your socks to help keep your toes warm.

    Warm it up on the radiator beforehand to help keep the heat in a bit longer!

  • Ride Fright

    You’ve charged your Garmin, pumped up your tyres and are all set to go out for a ride when the pre-ride nerves kick in.

    Your stomach is in knots and you’re wondering if you need to make yet another trip to the loo! it’s all quite exhausting and you haven’t even left the house yet!

    Feeling nervous is understandable especially when you’re going to do something new whether that’s a sportive or joining a group ride for the first time.

    Yet many of us feel those pre-ride butterflies before rides and distances that we’ve comfortably covered many times before yet we can find ourselves completely focused on the “what if’s” list!

    What if I’m not fast enough and get dropped?

    What if I get lost?

    What if I can’t get up the hill and need to get off and walk?

    What if I can’t finish the event

    What if I let everyone down?

    Checklist:

    Go through a mental checklist of all your what if’s. Are they really that much of a big deal? If they’re really stressing you out, write down the worst case scenarios and come up with a plan of how to deal with them.

    So for example …..

    WHAT IF I get a puncture? Learn how to fix a puncture and always have a puncture repair kit with you. Always take your phone with you so if you can’t fix it you can call someone for a ride home.

    WHAT IF I can’t make it up the hill? There is absolutely no shame in walking up a hill, and just ignore anyone who tells you different.

    Be Prepared:

    Make sure that your bike is in good condition, check your tyres, pack a tool kit and always carry a few quid incase you get stranded at the pub or café!

    Stay Hydrated:

    As little as 2% dehydration can effect our performance. As most of our anxiety is about ‘not being good enough’, being properly hydrated when you start riding and staying hydrated throughout a ride can only have a positive effect.

    Visualise The Ride:

    This is a technique used by many professional athletes and it works just as well for anyone. Before you ride, instead of focussing on the negative and what may go wrong, focus on the positives and create a vivid mental picture of yourself succeeding – getting up the hills, staying with the pack, having a good time and enjoying your ride. Continue to use positive mental imagery to stay focused and motivated when you experience obstacles or setbacks.

    Take A Moment:

    Research suggests that not only does our body language effect the way other people respond to us, but also how our own brains respond. Adopting a strong, confident and open body position can have enormous positive effects on your own confidence. Try it for yourself: Take two minutes before your ride, Stand in an open pose, shoulders relaxed, chest open (known as a high power pose). Close your eyes, breathe in deeply for a count of 3, hold for 1, and then breathe out fully for a count of 5 at the same time visualise the positive outcome of your ride.

    Stay focused on the here and now:

    Don’t think about what has happened on previous rides or focus on the what if’s, think about the sense of freedom you get on your bike and how much you enjoy the experience and remember there’s really no need to feel so nervous after all, it’s only a bike ride!

     

  • FLABinati The Rules

    Flabinati Logo

    Rule #1// Re–write the rules

    Rule #2// Lead from behind

    Rule #3// It’s all about the pie

    Rule #4// No excuses, unless you’ve got an excuse

    Rule #5// FLAB the man up! (FLAB the woman up too!)

    Rule #6// Cake isn't optional, it's essential!

    Rule #7// The correct number of cakes to have is C+1 where C is the number of cakes already eaten

    Rule #8// Coffee and tea must match the cake choice....

    Rule #9// Refer to weight as “potential energy” it’s what makes you go faster down hill, than those with less of it

    Rule #10// Represent the FLAB always – any passing cyclist must be greeted with a cheerless “now then”

    Rule #11// Riders are to be measured by quantity not quality

    Rule #12// Waists and chests are to be measured in inches

    Rule #13// Free your waistband and your legs will follow

    Rule #14// Enjoy rather than endure

    Rule #15// You’ve got a 32? Use it! If you haven’t, get one. *Addendum A 34 is also acceptable as is a triple

    Rule #16// All cyclists faster up hill than you shall be referred to as ‘hill whippets’

    Rule #17// Fat shall be referred to as potential muscle

    Rule #18// When you put on a FLAB jersey you instantly get 30,000 friends*at time of printing. Subject to change

    Rule #19// All fellow FLAB wearers will be greeted with an enthusiastic Ey Up/pat on the back/hug

    Rule #20// Guide the Bulge

    Rule #21// All rides must end with or include a refreshment stop

    Rule #22// A FLAB out cycling in any weather is badass

    Rule #23// Be self-stufficient - always carry pies

    Rule #24// Beer is as a hydration fluid

    Rule #25// FLAB kit is for members of the Bulge

    Rule #26// Like your tums, saddles should be smooth and comfortable

    Rule #27// Cycling efficiency is to be measured in miles per donut

    Rule #28// There are only three remedies for hunger:

    Pies
    Cake
    Butties

    Rule #29// Join us and be proud

    Rule #30// The rules are dead, long live the rules

    Rule #31// The correct number of gadgets to own is G + 1 where G is the number of gadgets already owned

    With thanks to Velominati and their inspiring collection of The Rules  - To submit your suggestions to our tongue in cheek (should that be pie in cheek?) version, please email fatlads@fatladattheback.com

    http://www.velominati.com/the-rules/

    FLABinati Rules 1 -30

     

  • LADY BITS

    Lady Bits

    Uncomfortable undercarriage discussions crop up frequently over on our community forum and it’s an issue which effects both men and women with people seeking recommendations for comfortable saddles and anti-chaffing creams.

     

    bits

    For us lasses, {however} the added inconvenience of monthly cycles (*Lads if you are still reading now, you only have yourselves to blame!) and hormonal changes means that intimate discomfort is a common issue, yet it’s a subject that’s rarely discussed in any detail. So here goes……

    As a former Breeze Coordinator, Breeze Champion and as a FLambassador I’ve had conversations about this with dozens of women and here’s the accumulation of our shared experiences!

     

    MONTHLY CYCLES

    mooncup

    MOONCUPS

    Everything you need to know about mooncups

    I’d never heard of them either until I read a book about ultra distance cycling and coping with periods on the road and in countries where sanitary products are not readily available.

    TAMPONS or SANITARY TOWELS

    tampons-or-pads1

    Tampons may seem like the obvious option but they’re not for everyone! Mooncups are a very environmentally friendly way of taking care of things and a couple of my friends wouldn’t be without theirs, but some lasses (me included) prefer sanitary towels.

    I don’t wear pants and just place the sanitary towel directly onto the pad of my shorts. I then place a small amount of chamois cream on the wings to prevent chafing and it works a treat for me. If I’m on a long ride I carry a few spares and some nappy sacs. Sometimes I’ll pop behind a bush (no pun intended!) to change and then dispose of it at the next loo stop.

    Intimate discomfort

    So, you’re saddle is sorted, you’ve got your padded shorts, you’re (probably)  riding knicker less and you’re used to riding during your period!

    Everything is great – YES?

    Well for me – NO!

    In the last couple of years, I started to experience extreme ‘internal’ discomfort - dryness, irritation and excruciating pain whilst trying to pee! It was so bad I thought I was going to have to give up cycling altogether but one day I went to my local pharmacy and explained in hushed tones what I was feeling. She recommended Canesten intimate moisture which helps the irritation and internal dryness caused by the friction of cycling and by approaching menopause. She also advised that if there was no improvement in a couple of days to see my GP but I’m pleased to say it’s been a game changer for me. I use it inside before I ride and then apply chamois cream externally and my under carriage is happy again. Canesintima_Intimate-Moisturiser-and-bottle

    Vagisil-Medicated-Cream-820522

     

    A similar conversation popped up on the FLAB community forum a few weeks ago with some lasses also using a cream called Vagisil which helps with itching in the intimate area along with the intimate moisturiser and chamois cream application on the outside calling it the recipe for ‘OUCH BE GONE’ and ‘ITCH BE GONE’

     

     

    BIKINI LINES

    I always thought waxing was the best way to avoid saddle soreness, though I must admit I did occasionally suffer with sores and ingrowing hairs but in 2016 I read this article about the Ladies Olympic cycling team being advised to rethink their intimate grooming regimes. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3743239/Why-Olympic-cyclists-DON-T-wax-bikini-lines-Pubic-hair-protects-against-saddle-soreness.html

    razor

    I took the advice and stopped waxing and can confirm that after cycling for 14 days consecutively across France my under carriage was in tip top shape with no ingrown hairs or saddle sores.

     

    So hopefully that’s some of your undercarriage questions answered. If you got this far and you’re a lad, please refer to paragraph 2* if you’re a lass, remember this is not medical advise and you must consult your GP about any issues you have!

    Happy Cycling!

  • Where's Your Mojo Gone?

    mojo

    ˈməʊdʒəʊ/

    • noun

    a magic charm, talisman, or spell.

    Where’s your Mojo gone? Here’s the magic you need to get it and you back in the saddle!

    Have you ever found yourself in a position where you just can’t get motivated to get on your bike?  You avoid looking at posts for the rides that are going out, you blame it on changes in the atmosphere, tiredness, anything that comes to mind to try and explain just where your mojo has gone!

    Well, that exact this started happening to me last year and my biggest fear was that I felt like I was really starting to fall out of love with cycling!  How could that possibly be true given that  I’d had so much fun training for LEJOG in 2015 and maintaining that fitness through 2016 but for some reason I found myself begrudgingly throwing my leg over the bike one Saturday morning for a training ride, only because I’d signed up for another challenge in an attempt to retain the fitness I’d achieved the year before.

    Having an event to train for had motivated me in the past and was a great excuse to always be cycling.  I had so much fun, so I never felt like I was training but now I felt like I was really starting to dislike it.

    IMG_5990

    Riding with friends had always been a way to get me out but one ride buddy moved away and another had a nasty cycling accident so she couldn’t ride for a few months…my mojo had, by now, well and truly left the building, I was cycling because I ‘had’ to not because I wanted to.

    Even decent weather didn’t motivate me but I decided one day to give myself a kick up the backside and get out for a ride. 10 miles in I had a tantrum, got off my bike and stamped my feet, literally, feeling frustrated with myself for not enjoying it. How had I come to loath cycling so much? Was our love affair finished?

    Fast forward a few weeks and I’ve been busy with work and projects at home and I’m still mojo less. Finding a happy balance between cycling and life isn’t easy for me as I have an all or nothing personality that mythical area of balance that apparently sits between the two extremes eludes me.

    The FLAB community forum, for which I am “The Guardian”, has rekindled my interest. I enjoy reading the posts and seeing how excited and proud people are of their achievements and it’s reminded me of why I fell in love with cycling years ago and how inspired I used to feel to ride and to encourage others into this great sport.

    image2

    I finally went back out for a ride and for the first time in a few months and I really enjoyed it, what had changed? I got back on my bike that day because I wanted to and not because I had to.

    As they say everything is clearer in retrospect, I’ve realised that I’m far too hard on myself. Thinking that missing a training ride because my body hurt, was a sign of weakness isn’t helpful and if I’d stopped berating myself I’d have realised that I was overtraining. I have now learnt a very valuable lesson about the importance of recovery and being kinder to myself.

    I’ve got a FLAB social ride coming up this weekend and I feel excited, my love affair has been rekindled a trial separation was just what we needed for me to fall back in love.

  • Cadence

    Cadence

    What is cadence?

    Cadence is the rate at which you turn your pedals or number of revolutions of your crank per minute while there is no magic number aiming for 90rpm is a good goal.

    _AM11339

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Why does cadence matter?

    Cadence is important to stop your muscles fatiguing to early, using the correct cadence will improve your cycling efficiency allowing you to cycle faster and for longer before your muscles tire.

    What’s the best way to measure cadence?

    The easiest but not necessarily the most accurate way is to count how many times your right knee comes up in 30 seconds and double it but the best way is to fix a cadence sensor to your bike that links to your cycle computer which is much more accurate.

    Will a good cadence improve my speed?

    In a nutshell yes, if you’re currently pushing too high a gear and find that you can only ride so far before your legs give up, focusing on your cadence will help you ride further and make sure you’re using your gears efficiently and will help with both speed and endurance as you’ll be able to ride faster and further for longer and make you into a more efficient cyclist.

    orig_11183_174541297357303f774f1a2

    Keep it simple…

    There is so much information out there regarding what we should or shouldn’t be doing when it comes to cadence and it’s very difficult as a beginner to make all this advice work without feeling confused and overwhelmed by the technicality of it all so keep it simple

    Measure your cadence and work to keep it within 80-100rpm to make you more efficient as pushing a low cadence in a high gear will fatigue your legs very quickly.

    After a while when you’ve found your cadence and have gotten used to using your gears efficiently you can look online for drills to further improve your cadence and speed.

  • Doris - Ade's Inner Voice

    Meet Doris, my doubting inner voice…

    She’s has been around a lot just lately – Bitch!

    Doris sits on my shoulder and whispers “you can’t do it, you’re just not good enough…”

    I’ve learned to put Doris in a little box to keep her quiet but when I’m having a bad day she pops out and starts whispering again…

    I’ve learned to acknowledge Doris, sometimes when I’m going up a hill thighs burning, lungs bursting, she’ll put in an unwanted appearance, screaming at me to stop, yelling that there’s no way I can do it!

    I say “shut the $@&% up Doris. I know it hurts but the pain is temporary, we can make it a bit further just to the next tree or lamppost…”, keeping Doris in her box can be so distracting that before I know it we’re at the top of the hill.

    Now all my cycling buddies have named their doubting inner voices, and if someone tells us Daphne has joined us for the ride or that Deirdre popped out on the last hill, it’s our way of saying we’re struggling a little bit and then we all have a laugh about giving Daphne, Deirdre or Doris a rollicking and carry on. It has a powerful effect and just talking about it instantly puts all our fears at bay.

    I have days where Doris is so powerful, I just don’t have the energy to shut her up, and that’s ok as it’s just part of what makes me human after all.

    But accepting Doris, naming her and talking about her has had a huge effect on my mental strength and without doing so I wouldn’t have been able to cycle the length of France or climb Mont Ventoux or cycle LE JOG. Doris is ever present whether she’s inside or outside of the box and acknowledging her as being part of me has taught me a great life lesson that my most powerful muscle is my mind and where the mind goes the body follows.

  • One Simple Lifestyle Change Was Enough To Change My Life Forever

    DSC_0183Two months into cycling to work and I liked it that much, I started to use the bike for other things like getting to the shops and visiting friends. It was not all good though, because the bike was old, it kept getting punctures and eventually the bottom bracket went.

    I had recently visited my younger brother Adam in Holland and while out there had borrowed an old bike and I really loved it. It had a basket on the front and panniers and a frame that was easy to get on and off with a sit up and beg comfy position.

    I went to my nearest chain bike store and had a look at the bikes, finding one that was just what I wanted. It was a heavy blue thing, but I was in love with it.

    Cycling had improved my mood so much by this point, but I still had not given it a second thought, I was just not having as many dark days.

    Depression is strange, I didn't realise I had it and often blamed my situation for by bad mood. The slightest thing sometimes would set it off and for days I would wake up feeling either angry or upset, alone and with no end to a way out. Sometimes it would last for weeks and months. I felt like no-one understood and I wanted to hide. The anger was horrible and it often led to days of crying and a big feeling of hopelessness.

    The new bike filled me with so much happiness, I was so excited to get it, like it was Christmas again when I was 10. I also purchased a pannier rack and basket for the front. Sorted!

    My friend Jan was asking for subjects for her photography course and I volunteered to be a model. She waited for me one morning as I cycled to work and snapped a picture of me zooming down the hill and around the corner. That pic said it all.
    First bike! Fast pic

    Just one simple lifestyle change was enough to change me and my life forever.

    I didn't know, I was at that time just happy being happy!

    POWER BALL RECIPE

    These are brilliant. Only 3 ingredients and just as good as energy bars but without the additives!

    You will need a blender.

    Power balls recipe

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